Korea — Day 3 Part 1: Deoksugung Palace & Namsangol Hanok Village

Day 3.

Deoksugung, also known as Gyeongun-gung, Deoksugung Palace, or Deoksu Palace, is a walled compound of palaces that was inhabited by various Korean royalties until the Japanese occupation of Korea around the turn of the 20th century. — Wikipedia

The buildings are of varying construction, including some of natural cryptomeria wood, painted wood, and stucco.

Deoksugung was originally the residence of Prince Wolsan, the older brother of King Seongjong. This residence became a royal ‘palace’ during the Seven-Year War after all of the other palaces were burned in 1592 during the Japanese invasions of the Seven-Year War. King Seonjo was the first Joseon king to reside at the palace. King Gwanghaegun was crowned in this palace in 1608, and renamed it Gyeongun-gung (경운궁, 慶運宮) in 1611. After the official palace was moved to the rebuilt Changdeokgung in 1618, it was used as an auxiliary palace for 270 years and was renamed Seogung (West Palace).

Namsangol Hanok Village, also known as “A Village of Traditional Houses in the Namsan Valley”, is a Korean village located in the area of Pil-dong neighborhood in Jung-gu, a central district of Seoul, South Korea where hanok (한옥) or Korean traditional houses have been restored to preserve the original atmosphere of the area. —Wikipedia

The Namsangol Hanok Village offers one the opportunity to experience a wide cross-section of Joseon-era citizenry and activities, from royalty to commoners. A great effort has been made to accurately furnish each dwelling with appropriate era and social status appointments.

Five traditional houses, including some of the residences of high government officials – some of the largest mansions in Seoul at the time, along with commoners houses were moved to the 7,934 sq Meters/9,489 sq Yards grounds containing the restored village.

The location of the village was originally the site of a well known Joseon-era summer resort called Jeonghakdong. Jeonghakdong means “The land of the fairies for the blue crane where the Jeonugak Pavillion stands along the stream in the valley”. The area boasted such superb scenery that it was called the land of the fairies and was considered one of the five most beautiful parts of Seoul.

Note: All text content are taken from Wikipedia. (I know I’m lazy :-p)

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